Wednesday, October 6, 2010

Asian Delicacies - Fried Bats Anyone?

I think what a culture eats reveals a lot about itself. Take for instance Asian cuisine.

To the left appears to be a new Japanese cuisine: insect sushi.  There are even mating worms at bottom left. 






Check out these fine Chinese delicacies:

Scorpion soup anyone?

Ummm! Corn on the cob and skewered snake!

Yum! Skewered baby nestling sparrows

What would they ever do without fried mice?

 Those worms ain't no mini fries!

 
More Japanese delicacies:
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 On a cold winter day have some cockroach noodle soup why don't you?

Here's some stats on insect food taken from the Chibilicious Blog:

* There are edible insects. Most of them are and there are a few species that are palatable, high in nutrition and are easily obtainable.

* Many species of insect are very high in protein and low in fat. You have to admit, that is a good ratio.

* According to research, insects are tasty. If you are too grossed-out to have them as main dish, they could be converted to flour and be added to bread or other dishes for additional protein boost.

* Compared to meat, insects are easier to raise. You don’t have to clean manure or drag in hay to feed them. There are no veterinary bills and you can have them in your apartment and get no complaints.

* It is nowhere gory in butchering insects. I do not even want to compare how cattle are butchered for us to eat.

* The action of raising insects is environmentally friendly. They only need minimal space per pound of protein. They have less feed ration compared to other animals to raise and are very low in the food chain. And yet, they are healthy, tasty and IS part of the food chain (if you look closely how mankind, especially cavemen or early men lived on insects).

* No animal (or should I say insect) activists will fight you against eating insects. There are no wildlife habitat destroyed to eat insects. Insects and earthworms can even be incorporated into a recycling program… vegetable waste in, yummy insect protein out.